Wednesday, December 28, 2011

New Years Resolutions?

Every year around this time, I start my debate about New Years Resolutions.
Should I make any resolutions? Should I make a list? Should I track what I achieve? Should I just not bother and eat another Christmas Cookie?

Millions of people look at the New Year as an opportunity to correct the glaring flaws the old year has brought to light (or the glaring flaws the old old year brought to light, or the year before that, or the year before that...). We often find ourselves going over the same old goals: lose ten pounds, find a new job, meet the one. We say in our heads that this is the year we are finally going to do this or that, and then we will be happy and fulfilled, and never have to worry about that particular flaw again.

The truth about resolutions: most of us start out strong in January, and may even continue our resolve into February. By March, most resolutions are dumped, broken, or just plain forgotten. Does this make the New Years Resolution a bad idea?

No. New Years Resolutions sometimes do result in achieving long term success (I started running seriously for the New Year, and I ended up sticking with it). The problem isn't the resolution. The problem lies in our commitment to the resolution. What gives us the drive to stick to the diet we start? What convinces us that giving online dating one more try is actually going to be successful this time?

Success with resolutions is all in the planning, rewarding, and the long-term attitude. Most changes we seek to make don't take the whole year to achieve, but maintaining those changes takes a few changes in habits. The next several posts, I'm going to commit to the changes I would like to see myself make in this new year, and I'm going to write about how I'm going about making those changes.

Interested in a little help with planning for your goals? Comment here, and we can talk about it!